New TECH Talk: Improvements in hearing preservation research

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Dr. David Friedmann, Neurotologist at NYU, explains how the professional interest to routinely consider hearing preservation has helped to progress the cochlear implant from solely a communication device to a more holistic, natural auditory experience.  In fact, evidence from independent research that he participated in at NYU demonstrates that patients who can successfully use a cochlear implant combined with an acoustic component, tend to perform better – including their experience with music and sound quality.1

While the search for a common definition remains elusive, Dr. Friedmann explores various perspectives on hearing preservation, depending on the audience. For example, surgeons consider hearing preservation as evidence of an atraumatic procedure, while audiologists are more focused on enhancing outcomes by incorporating acoustic hearing into the cochlear implant experience. Alternatively, patients may be most concerned with their ability to hear when the device is off.  Dr. Friedman also reflects on his experience and the benefits of using the Slim Modiolar electrode in patients with residual acoustic hearing after surgery that could benefit from amplification.

Dr. Friedman also reflects on his experience and the benefits of choosing the Slim Modiolar electrode for patients with residual acoustic hearing after surgery that could benefit from amplification.

Watch now to learn more about how the preservation of residual acoustic hearing may enhance performance outcomes!

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References:

1.    Friedmann, D. R., Kamen, E., Choudhury, B., & Roland, J. T. (2019). Surgical Experience and Early Outcomes With a Slim Perimodiolar Electrode. Otology & Neurotology40(3). doi: 10.1097/mao.0000000000002129 

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